Posted in historical fiction, Literature

“Warlight” by Michael Ondaatje

I’ve finished another one. This one was something different or outside the norm for me. I’m not going to say this book was terrible but I had a hard time continuing to read this at times. I like to read books that are hard to put down and this book was the opposite for me. Again, I’m not saying this book was bad…..I just think it’s not my cup of tea. This book felt like one of those books that you’re forced to read for school that you don’t necessarily like and then you have to write a book report on it afterwards.

Synopsis: It is 1945, and London is still reeling from years of war. Fourteen-year-old Nathaniel and his older sister, Rachel, seemingly abandoned by their parents, have been left in the care of an enigmatic figure they call The Moth. They suspect he may be a criminal and grow both more convinced and less concerned as they come to know his eccentric crew of friends: men and women with a shared history, all of whom seem determined now to protect and educate (in rather unusual ways) the siblings. But are they really what and who they claim to be? And how should Nathaniel and Rachel feel when their mother returns without their father after months of silence–explaining nothing, excusing nothing? A dozen years later, Nathaniel begins to uncover all he didn’t know or understand during that time, and it is this journey–through reality, recollection, and imagi-nation–that is told in this magnificent novel.

Posted in children's, historical fiction, Literature

“Chains” by Laurie Halse Anderson

I’ve finished this book over the weekend and I wanted to share it with you. This book is more from the historical fiction genre and I don’t normally read stuff from that genre but I was glad I read it. It was something a little outside what I normally read but I found the story kept me entertained. This book was hard to put down because I just had to find out what Isabel was up to next. Luckily, this book is part of a trilogy so I’ve got 2 more books to learn more about Isabel and what happens to her.

If an entire nation could seek its freedom, why not a girl?

As the Revolutionary War begins, thirteen-year-old Isabel wages her own fight…for freedom. Promised freedom upon the death of their owner, she and her sister, Ruth, in a cruel twist of fate become the property of a malicious New York City couple, the Locktons, who have no sympathy for the American Revolution and even less for Ruth and Isabel. When Isabel meets Curzon, a slave with ties to the Patriots, he encourages her to spy on her owners, who know details of British plans for invasion. She is reluctant at first, but when the unthinkable happens to Ruth, Isabel realizes her loyalty is available to the bidder who can provide her with freedom.

From acclaimed author Laurie Halse Anderson comes this compelling, impeccably researched novel that shows the lengths we can go to cast off our chains, both physical and spiritual.

Posted in historical fiction, Literature

“What the Night Sings” by Vesper Stamper

Well, I can add another book to my list of books I’ve read this year. I had read “Anne Frank: The Diary of A Young Girl” a couple of years back. It gave me the perspective of what it was like to be a Jew who was trying to hide from the Nazi’s during WW2 in the hopes that they can stay hidden until the war is over. This book gives you a completely different perspective and shows you what it’s like to be a Jew who actually got caught by the Nazi’s, separated from your family and sent to live in a concentration camp before finally being liberated. If you want to read something different that will change how you look at history, this will be a good book.

Synopsis: After losing her family and everything she knew in the Nazi concentration camps, Gerta is finally liberated, only to find herself completely alone. Without her papa, her music, or even her true identity, she must move past the task of surviving and on to living her life. In the displaced persons camp where she is staying, Gerta meets Lev, a fellow teen survivor who she just might be falling for, despite her feelings for someone else. With a newfound Jewish identity she never knew she had, and a return to the life of music she thought she lost forever, Gerta must choose how to build a new future.

Posted in historical fiction, Literature, Western

“Fort Whiskey” by David Banks

I recently finished reading this book and I wanted to share it with you. I ordered this book online at Books-a-million.com and it showed up in pristine condition. I loved this book. It only took me a couple of days to read it, which is pretty fast for me. The characters really came to life. They seemed so real and believable. The story kept me hooked from beginning to end. I was surprised when I got to the end but I did like how the book ended. I hope that there will be more literature in store from this author.

Synopsis: At the tail-end of the Civil War, the United States was in the grip of an internal struggle many thought it would never see the end of. Moral and political struggles gave way to violence, gunpowder and bloodshed filling the landscape. The struggle found was mirrored in the life of Willis Reed, a young soldier torn between his duty to his family and to the love of his life. In his adventure, set in the state of Arkansas, which was so hotly contested in the war, can he choose what is right and make it out with his life?