Posted in Literature, Other Fiction

“The House on Foster Hill” by Jaime Jo Wright

I wanted to share with you what I just finished reading on my Kindle Fire. This book was told through the perspective of 2 different character in 2 completely different periods in time. It wasn’t hard to follow though despite going back and forth between the two. I was glad the book ended the way it did. I hate it when you spend all that time reading a book and end up with a disappointing ending. If you like a good, clean mystery then you’d probably enjoy this book.

Synopsis: Kaine Prescott is no stranger to death. When her husband died two years ago, her pleas for further investigation into his suspicious death fell on deaf ears. In desperate need of a fresh start, Kaine purchases an old house sight unseen in her grandfather’s Wisconsin hometown. But one look at the eerie, abandoned house immediately leaves her questioning her rash decision. And when the house’s dark history comes back with a vengeance, Kaine is forced to face the terrifying realization she has nowhere left to hide.

A century earlier, the house on Foster Hill holds nothing but painful memories for Ivy Thorpe. When an unidentified woman is found dead on the property, Ivy is compelled to discover her identity. Ivy’s search leads her into dangerous waters and, even as she works together with a man from her past, can she unravel the mystery before any other lives–including her own–are lost?

Posted in Literature, Other Fiction

“The Saturday Night Ghost Club” by Craig Davidson

I finished another book recently and I just wanted to share. I don’t want to spill too much because I won’t want to spoil anything for those of you who plan on reading this at some point in the future. This book was described as a heartwarming coming-of-age story but I also found it a little spooky. You’ll understand what I mean about spooky when you get towards the end and they reveal an important part of the story. But I thought it was a good book and it’s kind of a quick read.

Synopsis: Growing up in 1980s Niagara Falls – a seedy but magical, slightly haunted place – Jake Baker spends most of his time with his uncle Calvin, a kind but eccentric enthusiast of occult artifacts and conspiracy theories. The summer Jake turns twelve, he befriends a pair of siblings new to town, and so Calvin decides to initiate them all into the “Saturday Night Ghost Club.” But as the summer goes on, what begins as a seemingly light-hearted project may ultimately uncover more than any of its members had imagined. With the alternating warmth and sadness of the best coming-of-age stories, The Saturday Night Ghost Club is a note-perfect novel that poignantly examines the haunting mutability of memory and storytelling, as well as the experiences that form the people we become, and establishes Craig Davidson as a remarkable literary talent.

Posted in Literature, Other Fiction

“Poison” by Sarah Pinborough

This book is a pretty quick read (I was able to read it in one day) but it is still able to keep me interested while I was reading. This book is a classic retelling of the story of Snow White and the Seven Dwarves. I was really surprised by the ending that I got but I understand that I was reading a “retelling” of a story, however, there are some things that you’ll notice that are similar between this and the classic story. The ending was kind of creepy though. (Please be advised that this book is definitely not for children.)

Synopsis: You think you know the story…

Once upon a time, in a kingdom far, far away, a handsome prince rescues a beautiful princess from the machinations of her wicked stepmother, sweeps her onto his white horse and rides off into the sunset.

Well, not quite.

Snow White as the innocent victim?

Prince Charming as the dashing hero?

Love at first sight?

Happily ever after?

In Sarah Pinborough’s wicked retelling of the classic tale, nothing is quite as you remember it…