Posted in Answer a question

Are you quarantined due to COVID-19?

I know there are some people that are probably stuck inside and can’t get out due to the Coronavirus going around. I haven’t gotten to that point yet where I live but I have a feeling that may come one day soon. Even though the Coronavirus was already in my state, they just announced over this past weekend that someone in my actual town tested positive for the Coronavirus. Yikes! Being that I work with the public, I wonder how long it’ll be now before everything gets shut down here? A lot of the restaurants were already “pick up only” or “curb side only”, at least for the ones that are still open. Plus, kids were already out of school for 2 weeks……and all this was before the confirmed case. I just have to see if the place where I work is considered essential or not (if it is considered essential, then we’ll have to stay open). We may just end up going “curb side only” like some of the restaurants.

Anyway, I have plenty of reading material to keep me occupied if I were to get quarantined. If anyone wants to, you can join me in reading. I’ll even take suggestions if anyone wants to throw some my way. I’ve also got some movies to watch (a lot of them are based on some of the literature I’ve read) so I can pull out some of them if I want to take a break from reading.

What do you have planned to do, if in the event you get quarantined? What are you doing to get by if you are already quarantined? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Posted in Answer a question

Quit reading?

Do you think you’ll ever stop reading?

Reading is something I’ve enjoyed my entire life. Even before I learned to read on my own, I enjoyed it when someone else read a book to me. I don’t ever see myself quitting because I’ve enjoyed it too much. These days, not only do I enjoy it but I find it a relaxing after a long, hard day at work. It takes my mind off the stress and the little things that can get you down. It’s like giving your brain a vacation without having to leave the comfort of your own home (and I’m sure it’s a lot cheaper than taking a vacation).

Are there any avid readers out there like me who think they’ll ever quite reading? Why or why not?

Posted in Answer a question

Should read?

What books do you think other people should read? I have a few books that I think everybody should read. I’ve listed them below in no particular order. Also, I’ve listed a synopsis directly beneath each book so you can see if you’d think you like it or not. One more thing……at the end of the synopsis, I’ve listed what age range the book is typically found in.

Discovered in the attic in which she spent the last years of her life, Anne Frank’s remarkable diary has since become a world classic—a powerful reminder of the horrors of war and an eloquent testament to the human spirit. 

In 1942, with Nazis occupying Holland, a thirteen-year-old Jewish girl and her family fled their home in Amsterdam and went into hiding. For the next two years, until their whereabouts were betrayed to the Gestapo, they and another family lived cloistered in the “Secret Annex” of an old office building. Cut off from the outside world, they faced hunger, boredom, the constant cruelties of living in confined quarters, and the ever-present threat of discovery and death. In her diary Anne Frank recorded vivid impressions of her experiences during this period. By turns thoughtful, moving, and amusing, her account offers a fascinating commentary on human courage and frailty and a compelling self-portrait of a sensitive and spirited young woman whose promise was tragically cut short. (Young Adult)

After losing her family and everything she knew in the Nazi concentration camps, Gerta is finally liberated, only to find herself completely alone. Without her papa, her music, or even her true identity, she must move past the task of surviving and on to living her life. In the displaced persons camp where she is staying, Gerta meets Lev, a fellow teen survivor who she just might be falling for, despite her feelings for someone else. With a newfound Jewish identity she never knew she had, and a return to the life of music she thought she lost forever, Gerta must choose how to build a new future.

What the Night Sings is a book from the heart, of the heart, and to the heart. Vesper Stamper’s Gerta will stay with you long after you turn the last page. Her story is one of hope and redemption and life–a blessing to the world.” –Deborah Heiligman, award-winning author of Charles and Emma and Vincent and Theo (Young Adult)

Shortly after moving into an old, spooky home, thirteen-year-old Thomas Small and his family start hearing strange noises. The house has a past, and when Thomas discovers a hidden passageway that may have been part of the Underground Railroad, the family realizes the house has a history as well. To find out all there is to know about the House of Dies Drear, Thomas must explore secret rooms—and the secrets of lives lived centuries before, lives that tell the story of America’s troubled early years. (Kids, 5th or 6th grade level)

Thomas Small and his best friend Pesty Darrow have been keeping the secret of the vast treasure that’s hidden in Mr. Pluto’s cave, once a stop on the Underground Railroad. Pesty also has to keep the treasure a secret from her family, who want it for themselves. And there are plenty more secrets in the underground passageways—hidden rooms, Indian legends, and terrifying ghosts. Now Thomas thinks that Pesty might be keeping some secrets from him, too. If they can’t trust each other, how will they ever protect the treasure? (Kids, 5th or 6th grade level)

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Program comes a haunting, romantic, and suspenseful story about one girl’s search for healing in a grand and mysterious hotel full of secrets.

Stay tonight. Stay forever.

When Audrey Casella arrives for an unplanned stay at the grand Hotel Ruby, she’s grateful for the detour. Just months after their mother’s death, Audrey and her brother, Daniel, are on their way to live with their grandmother, dumped on the doorstep of a DNA-matched stranger because their father is drowning in his grief.

Audrey and her family only plan to stay the night, but life in the Ruby can be intoxicating, extending their stay as it provides endless distractions—including handsome guest Elias Lange, who sends Audrey’s pulse racing. However, the hotel proves to be as strange as it is beautiful. Nightly fancy affairs in the ballroom are invitation only, and Audrey seems to be the one guest who doesn’t have an invite. Instead, she joins the hotel staff on the rooftop, catching whispers about the hotel’s dark past.

The more Audrey learns about the new people she’s met, the more her curiosity grows. She’s torn in different directions—the pull of her past with its overwhelming loss, the promise of a future that holds little joy, and an in-between in a place that is so much more than it seems…

And the 13th chapter will only add to the mystery behind the 13th floor of Hotel Ruby…and ultimately, what it means for Audrey.

Welcome to the Ruby.

Posted in Answer a question

Dream Library

Have you ever thought about what would be your “dream library” if you could have one?

I would like to have a fireplace somewhere in the room. But I would also like to have plenty of places to sit and relax. I can tolerate a couple of chairs sprinkled around the room but I would like to have a couch to stretch out on with a nice quilt draped over the back of it to keep me warm (I hate it when my feet get cold).

What would be your dream library if you were to design one? What would be a must have in your library (besides books, of course)?

Posted in Answer a question

Buy or borrow?

Do you prefer to own your own books or do you prefer to borrow them from your local library?

I prefer to own the books that I read. The reason being, I don’t have to worry about having a time limit to read the book before returning it to the library. I can spend as much time as a I want reading the book and I can go back to re-read it as often as I want to so long as I own the book.

There have been a few instances where if I’m not sure I’m going to like the book or not, then I’ll borrow the book from my local library so I’m not out any money if I don’t end up liking it. For instance, when I read Lemeny Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events, I borrowed that from the library. I checked out two books from the series at a time and I was able to read the two books I had before my time limit was up. I did end up liking the series but I wasn’t sure before I read them. Plus, there were a lot of books in that series to have to purchase if I wasn’t sure I was going to like it.

Posted in Answer a question

Addiction?

Do you think you have an addiction when it comes to reading? Why or why not? How far do you think it had to go before your reading habits become what someone would call an “addiction”?

Reading is always something I’ve always enjoyed. When I was a kid, there were probably a few times I got into trouble for reading when I should have been doing something else. But I’ve learned, as an adult, that there are times when it’s appropriate to read and other times when it’s not appropriate. For instance, I don’t read when I’m at work unless it’s my lunch hour. Also, if I’m at home, I’ll make sure my chores are done before I read.

Basically, I don’t think it’s an addiction because I make sure it doesn’t interfere with my responsibilities. As long as you’re not burying yourself in what you’re reading and you get your stuff done, I don’t see the harm in it.

Posted in Answer a question

The norm….?

Do you ever read books that are outside the norm for you? What books are outside the norm for you? Will you ever take the chance and read something outside your normal? Why or why not?

This is something that I haven’t done very often. I read “The Diary of Ann Frank” about 3 or 4 years ago and that’s something outside of what I normally read. There are certain genres I normally stick to like fantasy, horror, science fiction, mystery, or thriller/suspense. They all usually involve fiction in some form so “The Diary of Ann Frank” was something different for me. I had been wanting to read that book for a long, long while and I had never had the chance to until a few years ago.

What are some books that I can read that would be outside of the genres I normally read?