Smarter…?

Do you think people who read are smarter than people who don’t read? Why or why not?

I think there are benefits to reading, regardless if you are reading for the fun of it or you’re reading for learning purposes. You can broaden your vocabulary/grammar, learn some valuable lessons from the author, etc. But at the very least, I believe you can keep your mind sharper by reading (especially if you read on a regular basis). What about you?

Have you ever….?

Have you ever been turned off from reading? Why or why not?

I don’t think there was anything that has turned me off of reading. Now, I’ve had books that I’ve lost interest in because they didn’t hold my attention but I’ve never lost interest in reading completely. Even if I wasn’t the fastest reader or the best reader in my class, I still enjoyed reading. It was never a contest to me. I read because I find it entertaining and not to be better than anyone else. It’s like giving your brain a little vacation without having to leave the house (and books are much cheaper than going on an actual vacation).

“The Invited” by Jennifer McMahon

Finished another book today. I was not aware this book had come out until I came across this book at the book store by accident. I like haunted house stories but this was interesting to me since the haunted house in this one is being built. I don’t want to say too much so as not to spoil it for anyone interested in reading it but it’s interesting. It moves along at a nice pace and keeps you coming back for more with each chapter you read. I was also surprised by the end. It didn’t end like I thought it would but I am happy with how it ended.

Synopsis: A chilling ghost story with a twist: the New York Times bestselling author of The Winter People returns to the woods of Vermont to tell the story of a husband and wife who don’t simply move into a haunted house, they start building one from scratch, without knowing it, until it’s too late . . .

In a quest for a simpler life, Helen and Nate abandon the comforts of suburbia and their teaching jobs to take up residence on forty-four acres of rural land where they will begin the ultimate, aspirational do-it-yourself project: building the house of their dreams. When they discover that this charming property has a dark and violent past, Helen, a former history teacher, becomes consumed by the legend of Hattie Breckenridge, a woman who lived and died there a century ago. As Helen starts carefully sourcing decorative building materials for her home–wooden beams, mantles, historic bricks–she starts to unearth, and literally conjure, the tragic lives of Hattie’s descendants, three generations of “Breckenridge women,” each of whom died amidst suspicion, and who seem to still be seeking something precious and elusive in the present day.