Posted in Literature, mystery

“The Mile End Murder: The Case Conan Doyle Couldn’t Solve” by Sinclair McKay

I couldn’t do it. This is the latest book I tried reading but no matter what I did, I couldn’t finish it. Have you ever read a book that was so bogged down with details that you couldn’t drudge your way through it to finish the book? Well, that’s the way it was for me with this book. I felt like there was too much information being stuffed into this book that the train derailed badly. I didn’t even make it half way through the book before I had to put it down. I can’t remember the last time I wasn’t able to finish a book, this may be a first for me.

Synopsis: In 1860, a 70 year old widow turned landlady named Mary Emsley was found dead in her own home, killed by a blow to the back of her head.

What followed was a murder case that gripped the nation, a veritable locked room mystery which baffled even legendary Sherlock Holmes author, Arthur Conan Doyle. With an abundance of suspects, from disgruntled step children concerned about their inheritance and a spurned admirer repeatedly rejected by the widow, to a trusted employee, former police officer and spy, the case led to a public trial dominated by surprise revelations and shock witnesses, before culminating with one of the final public executions at Newgate.

This is the case Conan Doyle couldn’t solve and, after confounding the best detectives for years, has finally be solved by author Sinclair McKay. Discover ‘whodunit’ as the real murderer is revealed for the first time exclusively in this captivating study of a murder case in the nineteenth century, a story never told before.

Posted in horror, Literature

"A Head Full of Ghosts" by Paul Tremblay

I finally finished reading this last night right before I went to bed. It says on the front of the book that this book scared Stephen King……I didn’t find it THAT scary. I figure Stephen King would be harder to scare than this. Yes, I think this was a good book and I wasn’t expecting the ending, however, I think that statement was more over hyped. They probably used that to get more people to read the book. You may just have to read it for yourself and see what you think….

Winner of the 2015 Bram Stoker Award for Superior Achievement in a Novel

A chilling thriller that brilliantly blends psychological suspense and supernatural horror, reminiscent of Stephen King’s The Shining, Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, and William Peter Blatty’s The Exorcist.

The lives of the Barretts, a normal suburban New England family, are torn apart when fourteen-year-old Marjorie begins to display signs of acute schizophrenia.

To her parents’ despair, the doctors are unable to stop Marjorie’s descent into madness. As their stable home devolves into a house of horrors, they reluctantly turn to a local Catholic priest for help. Father Wanderly suggests an exorcism; he believes the vulnerable teenager is the victim of demonic possession. He also contacts a production company that is eager to document the Barretts’ plight. With John, Marjorie’s father, out of work for more than a year and the medical bills looming, the family agrees to be filmed, and soon find themselves the unwitting stars of The Possession, a hit reality television show. When events in the Barrett household explode in tragedy, the show and the shocking incidents it captures become the stuff of urban legend.

Fifteen years later, a bestselling writer interviews Marjorie’s younger sister, Merry. As she recalls those long ago events that took place when she was just eight years old, long-buried secrets and painful memories that clash with what was broadcast on television begin to surface—and a mind-bending tale of psychological horror is unleashed, raising vexing questions about memory and reality, science and religion, and the very nature of evil.

Posted in children's, Literature

“The Battle for the Castle” by Elizabeth Winthrop

Well, I’ve finished reading this novel on my Kindle Fire. I enjoyed this book as well, however, I think I enjoyed the first book more if I had to choose. I’m not saying this book was bad, far from it. I just think I enjoyed the adventure in the first book a little more than I did in this one. Still a good book to read with your kids, especially if you like medieval fiction

Synopsis: In this sequel to The Castle in the Attic, twelve-year-old William uses a magic token to return, through the toy castle in his attic, to the medieval land of Sir Simon, which is now menaced by a skeleton ship bearing a plague of evil.

Posted in children's, Literature

“The Castle in the Attic” by Elizabeth Winthrop

Well, I finished reading my first e-book for the year just now. This is an excellent book for children, I would probably say from about 7 till about 12. It depends on the reading ability of the child. If you are a fan of the “Indian of the Cupbard” book or you like medieval fiction, this would be something you should read with your children.

Synopsis: Ten-year-old William receives a wooden model of a medieval castle as a gift. It has everything he could possibly want, right down to a miniature drawbridge, a portcullis and a silver knight. In this enthralling story that weaves the everyday problems of growing up with magic and fantasy, the castle introduces William to an adventure involving magic, a ferocious dragon, a wicked wizard, and his own personal quest, where courage will finally triumph over fear.

Posted in Literature, mystery, young adult

“Creep” by Eireann Corrigan

I finished reading this book today and decided to share. I’m kind of on the fence about this book. It was a good story but I feel like identity of “the Sentry” was a little too easy to figure out. It may just be because I’m an adult and this is a book geared towards teenagers. I’m not trying to turn anyone off this book, it’s just that there are some aspects of this book that teenagers may find more appealing than adults.

Synopsis: Olivia is curious about the people moving into 16 Olcott Place. The last family there moved out in the dead of night, and the new family, the Donahues, has no idea why. Olivia becomes fast friends with Janie Donahue . . . so she’s there at the house when the first of the letters arrives:

–I am the Sentry of Glennon Heights. Long ago I claimed 16 Olcott Place as levy for my guardianship. The walls will not tolerate your trespass. The ceilings will bleed and the windows will shatter. If you do not cease your intrusion, the rooms will soon smell of corpses.–

Who is the Sentry? And why does the Sentry want the Donahues out of the house badly enough to kill? As Olivia and Janie explore the house, they find a number of sinister secrets . . . and as they explore their town, they find a hidden history that the Sentry wants to remain hidden forever.

Posted in Literature

Some new e-books…

I’ve got a lot more e-book on my Kindle Fire now so I should have plenty to choose from. I got an Amazon gift card yesterday and I’ve been spending it on some new e-books to add to the collection. It’s a good thing I have the Kindle now because my bookshelves are getting a little full at the moment. Anyway, you can check out what I got with my gift card from the list below…

Gum Town Detective Agency by David Banks
Small Horrors by Darcy Coates
The Carrow Haunt by Darcy Coates
The Haunting of Rookward House by Darcy Coates
Ghost Camera by Darcy Coates
Gwendy’s Button Box by Richard Chizmar and Stephen King
Gwendy’s Magic Feather by Richard Chizmar
The Haunting of Lannister Hall by Amy Cross
The Ghosts of David Brook by Amy Cross
Aberrations: The Witch’s Warnings by Joseph Delaney
Behold a Fair Woman by Francis Duncan
Winterhouse by Ben Guterson
The Secrets of Winterhouse by Ben Guterson
The Winterhouse Mysteries by Ben Guterson
Full Throttle by Joe Hill
The House by Bentley Little
Dark Halls by Jeff Menapace
The Lost by Natasha Preston
A Journey Through Charms & Defense Against the Dark Arts by Pottermore Publishing
A Journey Through Potions & Herbology by Pottermore Publishing
A Journey Through Divination & Astrology by Pottermore Publishing
A Journey Through Care of Magical Creatures by Pottermore Publishing
Mirror Image by Michael Scott and Melanie Ruth Rose
Nightmares by Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller
Nightmares: The Sleepwalker Tonic by Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller
Nightmares: The Lost Lullaby by Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller
The Screaming Staircase by Jonathan Stroud
The Whispering Skull by Jonathan Stroud
The Hollow Boy by Jonathan Stroud
The Creeping Shadow by Jonathan Stroud
The Empty Grave by Jonathan Stroud
The Castle in the Attic by Elizabeth Winthrop
The Battle for the Castle by Elizabeth Wintrop

Posted in children's, horror, Literature

“Ghost and Bone” by Andrew Prentice

This was an interesting book. I have read ghost stories before but I’d never read about a living boy who can turn into a ghost whenever he wants to. There are a few twists and surprises by the time you get to the end of the book but I liked the way the book ended though. This is a perfect book for kids who enjoy a good scary story and aren’t easily scared (age range is probably around 8 – 12).

Synopsis: Oscar Grimstone is a normal kid—aside from his secret Curse. Whenever he touches something living, like a flower or his classroom goldfish, they always seem to die. But then Oscar discovers an even bigger secret: even though he is very much alive, he has the ability to transform into a ghost.

Just when he thinks things can’t get any stranger two ghosts show up at his home in a skeleton carriage and he winds up joining them on a journey beyond the real world to a place he never knew existed—the city of ghosts. There Oscar will discover a place where people go once they die, before they aboard a ship to the The Other Side. But will he find out who he really is?