Posted in Literature

Some new e-books…

I’ve got a lot more e-book on my Kindle Fire now so I should have plenty to choose from. I got an Amazon gift card yesterday and I’ve been spending it on some new e-books to add to the collection. It’s a good thing I have the Kindle now because my bookshelves are getting a little full at the moment. Anyway, you can check out what I got with my gift card from the list below…

Gum Town Detective Agency by David Banks
Small Horrors by Darcy Coates
The Carrow Haunt by Darcy Coates
The Haunting of Rookward House by Darcy Coates
Ghost Camera by Darcy Coates
Gwendy’s Button Box by Richard Chizmar and Stephen King
Gwendy’s Magic Feather by Richard Chizmar
The Haunting of Lannister Hall by Amy Cross
The Ghosts of David Brook by Amy Cross
Aberrations: The Witch’s Warnings by Joseph Delaney
Behold a Fair Woman by Francis Duncan
Winterhouse by Ben Guterson
The Secrets of Winterhouse by Ben Guterson
The Winterhouse Mysteries by Ben Guterson
Full Throttle by Joe Hill
The House by Bentley Little
Dark Halls by Jeff Menapace
The Lost by Natasha Preston
A Journey Through Charms & Defense Against the Dark Arts by Pottermore Publishing
A Journey Through Potions & Herbology by Pottermore Publishing
A Journey Through Divination & Astrology by Pottermore Publishing
A Journey Through Care of Magical Creatures by Pottermore Publishing
Mirror Image by Michael Scott and Melanie Ruth Rose
Nightmares by Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller
Nightmares: The Sleepwalker Tonic by Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller
Nightmares: The Lost Lullaby by Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller
The Screaming Staircase by Jonathan Stroud
The Whispering Skull by Jonathan Stroud
The Hollow Boy by Jonathan Stroud
The Creeping Shadow by Jonathan Stroud
The Empty Grave by Jonathan Stroud
The Castle in the Attic by Elizabeth Winthrop
The Battle for the Castle by Elizabeth Wintrop

Posted in children's, horror, Literature

“Ghost and Bone” by Andrew Prentice

This was an interesting book. I have read ghost stories before but I’d never read about a living boy who can turn into a ghost whenever he wants to. There are a few twists and surprises by the time you get to the end of the book but I liked the way the book ended though. This is a perfect book for kids who enjoy a good scary story and aren’t easily scared (age range is probably around 8 – 12).

Synopsis: Oscar Grimstone is a normal kid—aside from his secret Curse. Whenever he touches something living, like a flower or his classroom goldfish, they always seem to die. But then Oscar discovers an even bigger secret: even though he is very much alive, he has the ability to transform into a ghost.

Just when he thinks things can’t get any stranger two ghosts show up at his home in a skeleton carriage and he winds up joining them on a journey beyond the real world to a place he never knew existed—the city of ghosts. There Oscar will discover a place where people go once they die, before they aboard a ship to the The Other Side. But will he find out who he really is?

Posted in Answer a question

Buy or borrow?

Do you prefer to own your own books or do you prefer to borrow them from your local library?

I prefer to own the books that I read. The reason being, I don’t have to worry about having a time limit to read the book before returning it to the library. I can spend as much time as a I want reading the book and I can go back to re-read it as often as I want to so long as I own the book.

There have been a few instances where if I’m not sure I’m going to like the book or not, then I’ll borrow the book from my local library so I’m not out any money if I don’t end up liking it. For instance, when I read Lemeny Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events, I borrowed that from the library. I checked out two books from the series at a time and I was able to read the two books I had before my time limit was up. I did end up liking the series but I wasn’t sure before I read them. Plus, there were a lot of books in that series to have to purchase if I wasn’t sure I was going to like it.

Posted in historical fiction, Literature

“Warlight” by Michael Ondaatje

I’ve finished another one. This one was something different or outside the norm for me. I’m not going to say this book was terrible but I had a hard time continuing to read this at times. I like to read books that are hard to put down and this book was the opposite for me. Again, I’m not saying this book was bad…..I just think it’s not my cup of tea. This book felt like one of those books that you’re forced to read for school that you don’t necessarily like and then you have to write a book report on it afterwards.

Synopsis: It is 1945, and London is still reeling from years of war. Fourteen-year-old Nathaniel and his older sister, Rachel, seemingly abandoned by their parents, have been left in the care of an enigmatic figure they call The Moth. They suspect he may be a criminal and grow both more convinced and less concerned as they come to know his eccentric crew of friends: men and women with a shared history, all of whom seem determined now to protect and educate (in rather unusual ways) the siblings. But are they really what and who they claim to be? And how should Nathaniel and Rachel feel when their mother returns without their father after months of silence–explaining nothing, excusing nothing? A dozen years later, Nathaniel begins to uncover all he didn’t know or understand during that time, and it is this journey–through reality, recollection, and imagi-nation–that is told in this magnificent novel.

Posted in Literature

Present…

I got to go to the bookstore today and get my Valentine’s Day present from my hubby. I love going to the bookstore regardless of the occasion. But I got some new books to read, which you’ll see below. One book I added furthers a series I’m in the middle of reading and the others are new books I discovered while shopping. Even better is I saved 10% on my purchase for being a member and I had a coupon for $10 off on top of that.

Nightfall by Jake Halpern & Peter Kujawinski
Wildefire by Karsten Knight
The Conference of the Birds by Ransom Riggs
The End and Other Beginnings (Stories from the Future) by Veronica Roth
Scream and Scream Again by R. L. Stine

Posted in Literature

Valentine’s Day Picks

Happy Valentine’s Day! Each of the following book are ones that I’ve read in the past year, plus, I wanted to recommend something different from what I suggested last year. They are either a romance novel or they have romance blended in with the story. Either way, I think they’d be perfect for individuals who would like to read a little bit of romance for Valentine’s Day….

The Shape of Water by Guillermo Del Toro & Daniel Kraus = If you’re searching for a good romance, you have to read this book. This will be a book that you won’t want to put down, even after you’ve finished reading it.

The Princess Bride by William Goldman = I watched this movie many times over the course of my life and I’ve always enjoyed it. But last year was the first chance I had to actually read the book. I normally don’t do that….normally I read the book first and watch the movie afterwards. I enjoyed reading the book despite this.

What the Night Sings by Vesper Stamper = Even though this book has to do with World War 2 and the holocaust, there is some elements of romance blended into this this story. This book can be both heartbreaking and heart warming to read.

Ten by Gretchen McNeil = This book is actually a thriller/suspense type novel but there is some romance blended into this novel. If you like romance and something that’ll keep you on the edge of your seat, then this will be the book for you.

Posted in fantasy, Literature

“The Wood” by Chelsea Bobulski

I finished this book last night before going to bed and I just wanted to share it. This book was a little different than what I thought it was going to be but I ended up enjoying this book by the time I got to the end. I had a hard time putting this book down when I was reading. Especially last night when I was on the last 50 or 60 pages of the book. If you like mystery and/or time travel, then you should try reading this book.

Synopsis: An enchanted wood poisoned at the roots. A girl bound by an inherited duty. And the lost traveler from another time who might help her uncover the truth.

From debut author Chelsea Bobulski comes The Wood, a YA novel filled with dark mystery and atmospheric fantasy.

Winter didn’t ask to be the guardian of the wood, but when her dad inexplicably vanishes, she’s the one who must protect travelers who accidentally slip through the wood’s portals.

The wood is poisoned, changing into something more sinister. Once brightly colored leaves are now bubbling inky black. Vicious creatures that live in the shadows are becoming bolder, torturing lost travelers. Winter must now put her trust in Henry―a young man from eighteenth century England who knows more than he should about the wood―in order to find the truth and those they’ve lost.

Bobulski’s beautiful and eerie young adult debut, is a haunting tale of friendship, family, and the responsibilities we choose and those we do not.

Posted in Answer a question

Addiction?

Do you think you have an addiction when it comes to reading? Why or why not? How far do you think it had to go before your reading habits become what someone would call an “addiction”?

Reading is always something I’ve always enjoyed. When I was a kid, there were probably a few times I got into trouble for reading when I should have been doing something else. But I’ve learned, as an adult, that there are times when it’s appropriate to read and other times when it’s not appropriate. For instance, I don’t read when I’m at work unless it’s my lunch hour. Also, if I’m at home, I’ll make sure my chores are done before I read.

Basically, I don’t think it’s an addiction because I make sure it doesn’t interfere with my responsibilities. As long as you’re not burying yourself in what you’re reading and you get your stuff done, I don’t see the harm in it.

Posted in Answer a question

The norm….?

Do you ever read books that are outside the norm for you? What books are outside the norm for you? Will you ever take the chance and read something outside your normal? Why or why not?

This is something that I haven’t done very often. I read “The Diary of Ann Frank” about 3 or 4 years ago and that’s something outside of what I normally read. There are certain genres I normally stick to like fantasy, horror, science fiction, mystery, or thriller/suspense. They all usually involve fiction in some form so “The Diary of Ann Frank” was something different for me. I had been wanting to read that book for a long, long while and I had never had the chance to until a few years ago.

What are some books that I can read that would be outside of the genres I normally read?

Posted in children's, historical fiction, Literature

“Chains” by Laurie Halse Anderson

I’ve finished this book over the weekend and I wanted to share it with you. This book is more from the historical fiction genre and I don’t normally read stuff from that genre but I was glad I read it. It was something a little outside what I normally read but I found the story kept me entertained. This book was hard to put down because I just had to find out what Isabel was up to next. Luckily, this book is part of a trilogy so I’ve got 2 more books to learn more about Isabel and what happens to her.

If an entire nation could seek its freedom, why not a girl?

As the Revolutionary War begins, thirteen-year-old Isabel wages her own fight…for freedom. Promised freedom upon the death of their owner, she and her sister, Ruth, in a cruel twist of fate become the property of a malicious New York City couple, the Locktons, who have no sympathy for the American Revolution and even less for Ruth and Isabel. When Isabel meets Curzon, a slave with ties to the Patriots, he encourages her to spy on her owners, who know details of British plans for invasion. She is reluctant at first, but when the unthinkable happens to Ruth, Isabel realizes her loyalty is available to the bidder who can provide her with freedom.

From acclaimed author Laurie Halse Anderson comes this compelling, impeccably researched novel that shows the lengths we can go to cast off our chains, both physical and spiritual.