Posted in horror, Literature

“The Complete Horowitz Horror” by Anthony Horowitz

I finished reading this last night. This book is actually a collection of short stories that are meant to be on the scary side (you can see a list below of the stories contained in this book along with a synopsis). I thought this was a good book. There were some mixed reviews of this online, some people thought that the stories contained within weren’t all that scary while other people said they enjoyed the book. I think this book is geared towards the young adult crowd so if you are an adult reading this book, you’ll have to take that into consideration when reading this. This would be a good book to get you in the mood for Halloween coming up.

Synopsis: New York Times Bestseller Anthony Horowitz’s horror collections, now in one volume! Welcome to a world where everything seems normal. At least, at first. But the sinister and truly terrifying lurk just beneath the surface. Like a bathtub with a history so haunted, no one dares get in it…or an ordinary-looking camera that does unspeakable things to its subjects…or an elevator filled with cannibals just waiting for their next victim to walk in. This wicked collection of eighteen macabre tales combining both Horowitz Horror and More Horowitz Horror will send shivers up your spine.

This edition includes…
1. Bath Night
2. Killer Camera
3. Light Moves
4. The Night Bus
5. Harriet’s Horrible Dream
6. Scared
7. A Career in Computer Games
8. The Man with the Yellow Face
9. The Monkey’s Ear
10. The Hitchhiker
11. The Sound of Murder
12. Burned
13. Flight 715
14. Howard’s End
15. The Elevator
16. The Phone Goes Dead
17. Twist Cottage
18. The Shortest Horror Story Ever Written

Posted in horror, Literature, mystery

Next from Joe Hill…

The hardcover edition of this came out today. Well, I purchased the e-book version of this on my Kindle this morning before going off to work. I’ve read the “Locke and Key” series and the “Wraith: Welcome to Christmasland” mini series so I’ve read some comics/graphic novels by Joe Hill before. I didn’t realize Joe Hill did another one until this morning while I browsing the internet. I’ll be interested in reading this when I get done with the book I’m currently on. This seems like something that would be good to read for Halloween.

Synopsis: June Branch visits her boyfriend, Liam, on Brody Island for a relaxing last weekend of summer. After an escaped group of criminals breaks into the house that June and Liam are watching, Liam is taken by them. June grabs a strange Viking axe and flees from the intruders. When one of the attackers finds her, she swings the axe and takes off his head, which rolls away and begins to babble in terror. For June to uncover the truth, she’ll need to hear the facts straight from the mouths of her attackers, with…or without their bodies attached. Collects issues #1-7.

Posted in horror, Literature, thriller/suspense

New e-books for the collection!

I’ve purchased 2 new e-books today. One is a new book that was just released today known as “One by One” by Ruth Ware. The other book I found by accident while I was looking for the first book and it’s called “The Ghost of Old Coal House” by Amy Cross. Both of them sounded right up my ally so I decided I had to get them. I’ve posted what the book cover looks like and the synopsis for each book so that you can see if you’d be interested in them as well.

Synopsis: Getting snowed in at a beautiful, rustic mountain chalet doesn’t sound like the worst problem in the world, especially when there’s a breathtaking vista, a cozy fire, and company to keep you warm. But what happens when that company is eight of your coworkers…and you can’t trust any of them?

When an off-site company retreat meant to promote mindfulness and collaboration goes utterly wrong when an avalanche hits, the corporate food chain becomes irrelevant and survival trumps togetherness. Come Monday morning, how many members short will the team be?

Synopsis: The year is 1843, and Arthur Foreman is on his way to visit his sister and her family for Christmas. Tucked under his arm, he carries the manuscript of a strange ghost story, written by the mysterious Walter Ward of Old Coal House.


Arriving at his sister’s home, Arthur immediately realizes that something is wrong. Elizabeth seems distant and distracted, and she finally erupts in a fit of fury. After being thrown out of the house, Arthur searches through the snowy night for refuge. All the usual boarding houses are closed for the holiday. His only choice is to make his way up the hill and knock on the of Old Coal House, and to ask for a room.


Soon, Arthur discovers that Walter Ward’s tales are not necessarily works of fiction after all. A strange figures stalks the halls and corridors of Old Coal House, tormenting Mr. Ward and driving him to drink. When he sets foot in the house for the first time, Arthur does not believe in ghosts at all. By the time he leaves the following morning, he has discovered the truth not only about Old Coal House itself, but also about a terrible tragedy that once struck his own family.

Posted in Literature, Uncategorized

“Lucy Crisp and the Vanishing House” by Janet Hill

I finished reading this last night and I thought it was a fun read. It kind of has this whimsical vibe to it (I’m sure that this is something meant for younger audiences so that might have something to do with it). But if you want something light to read or something quick to read (by yourself or with your kids) then this would be a good book to choose for that. This may be a good pick for people who like the Harry Potter series (mostly resembles the first few books in the series).

Synopsis: It has been a year since Lucy Crisp graduated from high school and she still hasn’t found her calling. That is, until she discovers an exclusive arts college called Ladywyck Lodge. On a whim, she applies and is thrilled to be accepted into their program. Lucy moves to Esther Wren, the charming little town where it’s based, and stays in the house her father buys as an investment: a magnificent building built by a sea captain in 1876. The house has history and personality –perhaps too much personality. . .

Strange things start happening: Lucy hears voices and footsteps in empty rooms. She sees people and things that should not be there. Furniture disappears and elaborate desserts appear. What’s worse is that the strange events are not restricted to her house. Lucy begins to understand that the town and its inhabitants are hiding many secrets, and Ladywyck is at the heart. As the eerie happenings escalate, Lucy fears she is being threatened — but she is determined not to let fairy potions, spells and talk of witchcraft scare her away.

Janet Hill’s enchanting debut novel is part mystery, part supernatural thriller and all fun.

Posted in Literature

“The Haunting of Gillespie House” by Darcy Coates

I’ve been reading this on my Kindle Fire and I was able to finish it last night. I didn’t realize it was going to be such a quick read but it was still a pretty good read despite that. This isn’t the first thing I’ve read by Darcy Coates (I’ve also read “The Haunting of Ashburn House” and “The House Next Door”, which are both on my Kindle) so that’s what kind of got me reading this book in the first place. I like reading things from this particular author but I am also a fan of horror. If you want to read something scary but you also want a quick read, this would be a good book to pick up.

Synopsis: Elle can’t believe her luck; she’s spending a month house-sitting the beautiful Gillespie property. Hidden near the edge of the woods and an hour’s drive from the nearest town, its dark rooms and rich furniture entice her to explore its secrets. There’s even a graveyard hidden behind the house, filled with tombstones that bear an identical year of death.

If only the scratching in the walls would be quiet…

The house’s dark and deadly history quickly becomes tangled with Elle’s life. At the center of it is Jonathan Gillespie, the tyrannical cult leader and original owner of the house. As Elle soon learns — just because he’s dead, doesn’t mean he’s gone.

Posted in Literature, Other Fiction

“The House on Foster Hill” by Jaime Jo Wright

I wanted to share with you what I just finished reading on my Kindle Fire. This book was told through the perspective of 2 different character in 2 completely different periods in time. It wasn’t hard to follow though despite going back and forth between the two. I was glad the book ended the way it did. I hate it when you spend all that time reading a book and end up with a disappointing ending. If you like a good, clean mystery then you’d probably enjoy this book.

Synopsis: Kaine Prescott is no stranger to death. When her husband died two years ago, her pleas for further investigation into his suspicious death fell on deaf ears. In desperate need of a fresh start, Kaine purchases an old house sight unseen in her grandfather’s Wisconsin hometown. But one look at the eerie, abandoned house immediately leaves her questioning her rash decision. And when the house’s dark history comes back with a vengeance, Kaine is forced to face the terrifying realization she has nowhere left to hide.

A century earlier, the house on Foster Hill holds nothing but painful memories for Ivy Thorpe. When an unidentified woman is found dead on the property, Ivy is compelled to discover her identity. Ivy’s search leads her into dangerous waters and, even as she works together with a man from her past, can she unravel the mystery before any other lives–including her own–are lost?

Posted in Answer a question

Summer Reading

How many of you will be engaged in a bit of reading this summer? How much reading do you think you’ll get done over the summer? Will your children be reading over the summer as well? Do you and your child/children read together or do you each do you own reading separately?

My summer reading usually goes the same as it does the rest of the year. I don’t normally go by any list made by any of the “experts” (although some of the stuff I’ve read has ended up on some of these lists without my knowing until after I looked at them). I usually just pick my books at random based on what I am interested in and what I feel like reading at the moment (I tend to move around a few different genre’s, it keeps me from getting bored with the same thing over and over again).

Please, feel free to share any reading you’ll be doing this summer in the comments section. I do take suggestions from friends, even if I don’t necessarily follow what the experts say about a particular book.

Posted in horror, Literature, mystery, young adult

“The Creeping” by Alexandra Sirowy

I finished reading this book last night. There is some teenage angst going on throughout the entire book. In a couple of places, I found it to be a little annoying but I wasn’t annoyed enough to stop reading. I guess I was determined enough to find out how the story ended. The story line was a good one so if you can over look the teenage angst and just focus on the story, then you may find this book enjoyable. That or the young adult crowd might find this book enjoyable to read.

Synopsis: Eleven years ago, Stella and Jeanie disappeared. Only Stella came back.

Now all she wants is a summer full of cove days, friends, and her gorgeous crush – until a fresh corpse leads Stella down a path of ancient evil and secrets.

Stella believes remembering what happened to Jeanie will save her. It won’t.

She used to know better than to believe in what slinks through the shadows. Not anymore.

Posted in Literature, mystery, young adult

“Creep” by Eireann Corrigan

I finished reading this book today and decided to share. I’m kind of on the fence about this book. It was a good story but I feel like identity of “the Sentry” was a little too easy to figure out. It may just be because I’m an adult and this is a book geared towards teenagers. I’m not trying to turn anyone off this book, it’s just that there are some aspects of this book that teenagers may find more appealing than adults.

Synopsis: Olivia is curious about the people moving into 16 Olcott Place. The last family there moved out in the dead of night, and the new family, the Donahues, has no idea why. Olivia becomes fast friends with Janie Donahue . . . so she’s there at the house when the first of the letters arrives:

–I am the Sentry of Glennon Heights. Long ago I claimed 16 Olcott Place as levy for my guardianship. The walls will not tolerate your trespass. The ceilings will bleed and the windows will shatter. If you do not cease your intrusion, the rooms will soon smell of corpses.–

Who is the Sentry? And why does the Sentry want the Donahues out of the house badly enough to kill? As Olivia and Janie explore the house, they find a number of sinister secrets . . . and as they explore their town, they find a hidden history that the Sentry wants to remain hidden forever.

Posted in Literature

Some new e-books…

I’ve got a lot more e-book on my Kindle Fire now so I should have plenty to choose from. I got an Amazon gift card yesterday and I’ve been spending it on some new e-books to add to the collection. It’s a good thing I have the Kindle now because my bookshelves are getting a little full at the moment. Anyway, you can check out what I got with my gift card from the list below…

Gum Town Detective Agency by David Banks
Small Horrors by Darcy Coates
The Carrow Haunt by Darcy Coates
The Haunting of Rookward House by Darcy Coates
Ghost Camera by Darcy Coates
Gwendy’s Button Box by Richard Chizmar and Stephen King
Gwendy’s Magic Feather by Richard Chizmar
The Haunting of Lannister Hall by Amy Cross
The Ghosts of David Brook by Amy Cross
Aberrations: The Witch’s Warnings by Joseph Delaney
Behold a Fair Woman by Francis Duncan
Winterhouse by Ben Guterson
The Secrets of Winterhouse by Ben Guterson
The Winterhouse Mysteries by Ben Guterson
Full Throttle by Joe Hill
The House by Bentley Little
Dark Halls by Jeff Menapace
The Lost by Natasha Preston
A Journey Through Charms & Defense Against the Dark Arts by Pottermore Publishing
A Journey Through Potions & Herbology by Pottermore Publishing
A Journey Through Divination & Astrology by Pottermore Publishing
A Journey Through Care of Magical Creatures by Pottermore Publishing
Mirror Image by Michael Scott and Melanie Ruth Rose
Nightmares by Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller
Nightmares: The Sleepwalker Tonic by Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller
Nightmares: The Lost Lullaby by Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller
The Screaming Staircase by Jonathan Stroud
The Whispering Skull by Jonathan Stroud
The Hollow Boy by Jonathan Stroud
The Creeping Shadow by Jonathan Stroud
The Empty Grave by Jonathan Stroud
The Castle in the Attic by Elizabeth Winthrop
The Battle for the Castle by Elizabeth Wintrop