Posted in Fun

Listen to some music…

I know this is a little different than what I’ve done in the past but I thought I could make my own little soundtrack for one of the books I’ve read recently. The book in question is one I’ve read a couple of days ago called “The Castle in the Attic” by Elizabeth Winthrop. So, if you have a few minutes to spare, go ahead and have a listen….

(Note: Just for the record, I don’t own any of this music and I don’t claim the rights to any of it in any way, shape or form. I just think the music would make some great music for this book, especially if this book were to be made into a movie.)

This is what I’d start the book off on….
This track here would be fitting for when the Silver Knight and William begin their adventure going into the forest and coming out at the castle.
While the entire soundtrack to this movie might fit very well in with the book, this track here would stand out as a good one for the ending.
Posted in children's, Literature

“The Castle in the Attic” by Elizabeth Winthrop

Well, I finished reading my first e-book for the year just now. This is an excellent book for children, I would probably say from about 7 till about 12. It depends on the reading ability of the child. If you are a fan of the “Indian of the Cupbard” book or you like medieval fiction, this would be something you should read with your children.

Synopsis: Ten-year-old William receives a wooden model of a medieval castle as a gift. It has everything he could possibly want, right down to a miniature drawbridge, a portcullis and a silver knight. In this enthralling story that weaves the everyday problems of growing up with magic and fantasy, the castle introduces William to an adventure involving magic, a ferocious dragon, a wicked wizard, and his own personal quest, where courage will finally triumph over fear.

Posted in Literature, mystery, young adult

“Creep” by Eireann Corrigan

I finished reading this book today and decided to share. I’m kind of on the fence about this book. It was a good story but I feel like identity of “the Sentry” was a little too easy to figure out. It may just be because I’m an adult and this is a book geared towards teenagers. I’m not trying to turn anyone off this book, it’s just that there are some aspects of this book that teenagers may find more appealing than adults.

Synopsis: Olivia is curious about the people moving into 16 Olcott Place. The last family there moved out in the dead of night, and the new family, the Donahues, has no idea why. Olivia becomes fast friends with Janie Donahue . . . so she’s there at the house when the first of the letters arrives:

–I am the Sentry of Glennon Heights. Long ago I claimed 16 Olcott Place as levy for my guardianship. The walls will not tolerate your trespass. The ceilings will bleed and the windows will shatter. If you do not cease your intrusion, the rooms will soon smell of corpses.–

Who is the Sentry? And why does the Sentry want the Donahues out of the house badly enough to kill? As Olivia and Janie explore the house, they find a number of sinister secrets . . . and as they explore their town, they find a hidden history that the Sentry wants to remain hidden forever.

Posted in Answer a question

Dream Library

Have you ever thought about what would be your “dream library” if you could have one?

I would like to have a fireplace somewhere in the room. But I would also like to have plenty of places to sit and relax. I can tolerate a couple of chairs sprinkled around the room but I would like to have a couch to stretch out on with a nice quilt draped over the back of it to keep me warm (I hate it when my feet get cold).

What would be your dream library if you were to design one? What would be a must have in your library (besides books, of course)?

Posted in Literature

Some new e-books…

I’ve got a lot more e-book on my Kindle Fire now so I should have plenty to choose from. I got an Amazon gift card yesterday and I’ve been spending it on some new e-books to add to the collection. It’s a good thing I have the Kindle now because my bookshelves are getting a little full at the moment. Anyway, you can check out what I got with my gift card from the list below…

Gum Town Detective Agency by David Banks
Small Horrors by Darcy Coates
The Carrow Haunt by Darcy Coates
The Haunting of Rookward House by Darcy Coates
Ghost Camera by Darcy Coates
Gwendy’s Button Box by Richard Chizmar and Stephen King
Gwendy’s Magic Feather by Richard Chizmar
The Haunting of Lannister Hall by Amy Cross
The Ghosts of David Brook by Amy Cross
Aberrations: The Witch’s Warnings by Joseph Delaney
Behold a Fair Woman by Francis Duncan
Winterhouse by Ben Guterson
The Secrets of Winterhouse by Ben Guterson
The Winterhouse Mysteries by Ben Guterson
Full Throttle by Joe Hill
The House by Bentley Little
Dark Halls by Jeff Menapace
The Lost by Natasha Preston
A Journey Through Charms & Defense Against the Dark Arts by Pottermore Publishing
A Journey Through Potions & Herbology by Pottermore Publishing
A Journey Through Divination & Astrology by Pottermore Publishing
A Journey Through Care of Magical Creatures by Pottermore Publishing
Mirror Image by Michael Scott and Melanie Ruth Rose
Nightmares by Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller
Nightmares: The Sleepwalker Tonic by Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller
Nightmares: The Lost Lullaby by Jason Segel and Kirsten Miller
The Screaming Staircase by Jonathan Stroud
The Whispering Skull by Jonathan Stroud
The Hollow Boy by Jonathan Stroud
The Creeping Shadow by Jonathan Stroud
The Empty Grave by Jonathan Stroud
The Castle in the Attic by Elizabeth Winthrop
The Battle for the Castle by Elizabeth Wintrop

Posted in children's, horror, Literature

“Ghost and Bone” by Andrew Prentice

This was an interesting book. I have read ghost stories before but I’d never read about a living boy who can turn into a ghost whenever he wants to. There are a few twists and surprises by the time you get to the end of the book but I liked the way the book ended though. This is a perfect book for kids who enjoy a good scary story and aren’t easily scared (age range is probably around 8 – 12).

Synopsis: Oscar Grimstone is a normal kid—aside from his secret Curse. Whenever he touches something living, like a flower or his classroom goldfish, they always seem to die. But then Oscar discovers an even bigger secret: even though he is very much alive, he has the ability to transform into a ghost.

Just when he thinks things can’t get any stranger two ghosts show up at his home in a skeleton carriage and he winds up joining them on a journey beyond the real world to a place he never knew existed—the city of ghosts. There Oscar will discover a place where people go once they die, before they aboard a ship to the The Other Side. But will he find out who he really is?

Posted in Answer a question

Buy or borrow?

Do you prefer to own your own books or do you prefer to borrow them from your local library?

I prefer to own the books that I read. The reason being, I don’t have to worry about having a time limit to read the book before returning it to the library. I can spend as much time as a I want reading the book and I can go back to re-read it as often as I want to so long as I own the book.

There have been a few instances where if I’m not sure I’m going to like the book or not, then I’ll borrow the book from my local library so I’m not out any money if I don’t end up liking it. For instance, when I read Lemeny Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events, I borrowed that from the library. I checked out two books from the series at a time and I was able to read the two books I had before my time limit was up. I did end up liking the series but I wasn’t sure before I read them. Plus, there were a lot of books in that series to have to purchase if I wasn’t sure I was going to like it.