Is it rude…?

First off, I want to wish a happy Halloween. I hope everyone has a safe and enjoyable holiday, especially for those going trick or treating at some point today.

Now, to the topic at hand. Do you consider reading to be rude rather than interacting with other people around you? Why or why not?

In this day in age, I see people buried in their cell phone all day. So, my question is how can someone accuse a person of being rude to read a book instead of interacting with the people around them when other people bury themselves in their phones? I’ve always been kind of on the shy side so it was always hard for me to interact with others. That may have been something that helped draw me to reading. So, I don’t consider it rude when someone reads instead of interacting with other people….some people are just introverts.

Biggest problem?

What is your biggest problem with reading?

For me, it’s finding enough time to read. I could spend all day reading if I am allowed to. Unfortunately, I have a job that I have to go to in order to help pay the bills. I do try to do chores and stuff like that on the days that I work so that on the days that I have off from my job, I can spend those days doing stuff I enjoy….like reading. If I could get paid to read, that would be a dream!

Finding enough literature to read is not a problem. You’d see what I mean if you could see all the books I’ve got on my bookshelves and the books I have on my Kindle. I’ve got three bookshelves in the spare bedroom and they’re nearly full. It’s the reason I had to get a Kindle so that I could have books without them taking up a lot of space.

One more round at the bookstore!

I was able to make one more purchase today at my local bookstore. This may be the last time I am able to make a book purchase for a while. I kind of went book crazy while I was off from work and I’m going to have to save my money for a while before I can buy more books again. The good news is I’ll have plenty of books to read for a while.

Anyway, you can see below what I was able to purchase with the money I had left. I think I’ve made out like a bandit but I’m pretty happy with what I’ve got.

“The Collector” by K. R. Alexander
“The Fear Zone” by K. R. Alexander
“Remember Me” by Chelsea Bobulski
“The Ghost Road” by Charis Cotter
“The Girl in the Locked Room” by Mary Downing Hahn
“After the Fire” by Will Hill
“The Complete Horowitz Horror” by Anthony Horowitz
“Ghost and Bone” by Andrew Prentice
“The War in the Dark” by Nick Setchfield
“The Spider Dance” by Nick Setchfield
“The Shapeshifters” by Stefan Spjut

Recommendations!

I’m always looking for that next book to read so I’m willing to take recommendations from others, especially if I know that person likes to read similar books. Anyway, if you like to read, I wouldn’t mind hearing your recommendations for some new literature for me to read.

Genre: Horror, science fiction, fantasy, mystery & thriller. I can take in the occasional romance if it’s good.

Have read: The Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling, the Chronicles of Narnia series by C. S. Lewis, the Last Apprentice series by Joseph Delaney, the Locke & Key series by Joe Hill, the Stoneheart trilogy by Charlie Fletcher, the Twilight series by Stephenie Meyer, the Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins, And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie, Hallowe’en Party by Agatha Christie, Murder Has a Motive by Frances Duncan, Murder for Christmas by Frances Duncan, The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly, The Cellar by Natasha Preston, The Charmed Children of Rookskill Castle by Janet Fox, Carrie by Stephen King, The Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill, The Host by Stephenie Meyer, etc.

Books I refuse to read: The Night Strangers by Chris Bohjalian. I read this book once upon a time and I really got into it at first but the ending disappointed me. This book really turned me away from that particular author and I won’t read anything remotely similar again.

Age Range: I normally read young adult and up. I will read children’s literature if it’s good enough to hold my interest (Harry Potter series is a good example).

The Great American Read

Last year, PBS held an eight-part series on tv to discuss the country’s best-loved novel. I did remember making my vote but I didn’t get a chance to watch any of the episodes on tv.

Did you watch the eight-part series? Did you place your vote to help determine which novel/series won? How many of the books on the list have you read? Do you plan on reading all the book on the list? What are your thoughts on the books that made the list?

  1. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee (Best Loved)
  2. Outlander (series) by Diana Gabaldon (Finalist)
  3. Harry Potter (series) by J. K. Rowling (Finalist)
  4. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (Finalist)
  5. The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkein (Finalist)
  6. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
  7. Charlette’s Web by E. B. White
  8. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
  9. The Chronicles of Narnia (series) by C. S. Lewis
  10. Jane Eyre by Charlote Bronte
  11. Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
  12. The Grapes of Wraith by John Steinbeck
  13. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
  14. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
  15. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  16. The Help by Kathryn Stockett
  17. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
  18. 1984 by George Orwell
  19. And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
  20. Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
  21. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
  22. Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry
  23. The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
  24. The Stand by Stephen King
  25. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
  26. A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
  27. The Color Purple by Alice Walker
  28. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
  29. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  30. The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger
  31. Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
  32. The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton
  33. The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
  34. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
  35. Dune by Frank Herbert
  36. The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery
  37. The Call of the Wild by Jack London
  38. The Clan of the Cave Bear by Jean M. Auel
  39. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
  40. The Hunger Games (series) by Suzanne Collins
  41. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
  42. The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
  43. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  44. The Giver by Lois Lowry
  45. Memoirs of a Geisha by Author Golden
  46. Moby Dick by Herman Melville
  47. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
  48. Game of Thrones (series) by George R. R. Martin
  49. Foundation (series) by Isaac Asimov
  50. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
  51. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
  52. Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
  53. The Godfather by Mario Puzo
  54. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  55. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
  56. The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
  57. The Shack by William P. Young
  58. A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
  59. The Hunt for Red October by Tom Clancy
  60. Beloved by Toni Morrison
  61. The Martian by Andy Weir
  62. The Eye of the World (series) by Robert Johnson/Brandon Sanderson
  63. Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
  64. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevesky
  65. The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
  66. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
  67. A Separate Peace by John Knowles
  68. Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
  69. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
  70. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
  71. Hatchet (series) by Gary Paulson
  72. Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
  73. The Twilight Saga (series) by Stephanie Meyer
  74. Tales of the City (series) by Armistead Maupin
  75. Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathon Swift
  76. Ready Player One by Earnest Cline
  77. Left Behind (series) by Tim LaHaye/Jerry B. Jenkins
  78. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
  79. Watchers by Dean Koontz
  80. The Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan
  81. Alex Cross Mysteries (series) by James Patterson
  82. Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe
  83. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
  84. Gilead by Marilynne Robinson
  85. Flowers in the Attic by V. C. Andrews
  86. Fifty Shades of Grey (series) by E. L. James
  87. The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut
  88. This Present Darkness by Frank E. Peretti
  89. Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  90. Another Country by James Baldwin
  91. Bless Me, Ultima by Rudolfo Anaya
  92. Looking for Alaska by John Green
  93. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz
  94. Swan Song by Robert R. McCammon
  95. Mind Invadors by Dave Hunt
  96. White Teeth by Zadie Smith
  97. Ghost by Jason Reynolds
  98. The Coldest Winter Ever by Sister Souljah
  99. The Intuitionist by Colson Whitehead
  100. Dona Barbara by Romulo Gallegos

What do you look for in a book?

What do you look for in a book? How do you go about finding that next book to read? I’m always looking for more books to read despite how many books I have on my shelves or stored on my Kindle Fire. Some people would go so far to say that I have an addiction to reading. Normally I enjoy browsing through my local bookstore. I can even order online through their website in the comfort of my own home. I like going through the racks and reading the synopsis on the back of the book, or on the inside of the dust cover, whichever the case may be. If there’s one that intrigues me, I’ll give it a try. So, I’m always browsing for that next book. However, I’m not above taking recommendations from other book lovers that have the same interests as me or can recommend something based on what I’ve read previously.

Why do you like reading?

There are probably a number of reasons why we like to read. I enjoy reading because it gives me an escape from all the hustle and bustle of every day life. If I’ve had a particularly stressful day, I can pick up a book and within minutes, I’ve immersed myself in the story and I’ve forgotten all about the hard day I’ve just experienced. It’s like giving your brain a vacation (but it’s cheaper than taking an actual vacation). I find reading to be something that is very relaxing. There are also some entertainment value in it…….it’s like the people who enjoy watching tv or movies (although I must admit I like to do those as well but probably not more than reading). You get to be transported to another place (and often times a completely different time) where you can spend countless hours learning about what is in that world that is created by the author that wrote that piece of literature. I guess I find it interesting to see what other people come up with just by using their imagination. So, if you don’t mine me asking, what are your reasons for reading? Feel free to leave a comment…

Reading versus movie/tv show

The question today is, which do you prefer…….reading the book or watching the movie/tv series. I, personally, enjoy reading the book. Reading is something I’ve enjoyed my whole entire life. Hollywood has taken to making these books into a movie or tv show of some kind, which is fine by me. I don’t mind watching a movie based on a book if I enjoyed the book. If I didn’t like the book, then you wouldn’t be able to get me to touch the movie/tv show with a ten foot pole.

Now, I’m all for reading the book but my hubby is the opposite. He’d rather watch the movie/tv show than read the book. With the Harry Potter series for example, I’ve read all the books and I’ve watched all the movies. My hubby on the other hand has at least watched the movies with me. I initially didn’t think he’d like the watching them with me, however, he did end up liking thm (much to my surprise). So, I can usually get my hubby to watch the movie or tv show with me…..as long as it’s not really girly or anything like that.

But there are a couple of different reasons why I choose to read instead of watch. The book, I can take that with me a lot easier than I can watching a tv or movie. I know that with technology is these days, you can watch stuff on your smartphone. But I’d rather not waste the battery on my phone just to watch something. I don’t want to have a dead phone and need to make a call in an emergency. Also, in the case of the movies, I can spend more time reading and enjoying it. A movie is usually over within a couple of hours and there is a lot they have to leave out with a limited time frame.

“Poison” by Sarah Pinborough

This book is a pretty quick read (I was able to read it in one day) but it is still able to keep me interested while I was reading. This book is a classic retelling of the story of Snow White and the Seven Dwarves. I was really surprised by the ending that I got but I understand that I was reading a “retelling” of a story, however, there are some things that you’ll notice that are similar between this and the classic story. The ending was kind of creepy though. (Please be advised that this book is definitely not for children.)

Synopsis: You think you know the story…

Once upon a time, in a kingdom far, far away, a handsome prince rescues a beautiful princess from the machinations of her wicked stepmother, sweeps her onto his white horse and rides off into the sunset.

Well, not quite.

Snow White as the innocent victim?

Prince Charming as the dashing hero?

Love at first sight?

Happily ever after?

In Sarah Pinborough’s wicked retelling of the classic tale, nothing is quite as you remember it…

“And The Trees Crept In” by Dawn Kurtagich

I finished reading this novel this morning and I wanted to share it with you. It was a pretty creepy novel about two girls who run away to their aunt’s house and try to avoid the clutches of the Creeper Man. The way the Creeper Man is described, he sounds a lot like the Slender Man but he adds a nice creepy factor to the story. The ending was pretty surprising but the story will be explained when you reach the end. Overall, I was pleased with the novel and how it turned out.

Synopsis: Stay away from the woods….
When Silla and Nori arrive at their aunt’s home, it’s immediately clear that the manor is cursed. The endless creaking of the house at night and the eerie stillness of the woods surrounding them would be enough of a sign, but there are secrets, too – questions that Silla can’t ignore: Why does it seem that, ever since they arrived, the trees have been creeping closer? Who is the beautiful boy who’s appeared from the woods? And who is the tall man with no eyes who Nori plays with in the basement at night…a man no one else can see?