Posted in Answer a question

Should read?

What books do you think other people should read? I have a few books that I think everybody should read. I’ve listed them below in no particular order. Also, I’ve listed a synopsis directly beneath each book so you can see if you’d think you like it or not. One more thing……at the end of the synopsis, I’ve listed what age range the book is typically found in.

Discovered in the attic in which she spent the last years of her life, Anne Frank’s remarkable diary has since become a world classic—a powerful reminder of the horrors of war and an eloquent testament to the human spirit. 

In 1942, with Nazis occupying Holland, a thirteen-year-old Jewish girl and her family fled their home in Amsterdam and went into hiding. For the next two years, until their whereabouts were betrayed to the Gestapo, they and another family lived cloistered in the “Secret Annex” of an old office building. Cut off from the outside world, they faced hunger, boredom, the constant cruelties of living in confined quarters, and the ever-present threat of discovery and death. In her diary Anne Frank recorded vivid impressions of her experiences during this period. By turns thoughtful, moving, and amusing, her account offers a fascinating commentary on human courage and frailty and a compelling self-portrait of a sensitive and spirited young woman whose promise was tragically cut short. (Young Adult)

After losing her family and everything she knew in the Nazi concentration camps, Gerta is finally liberated, only to find herself completely alone. Without her papa, her music, or even her true identity, she must move past the task of surviving and on to living her life. In the displaced persons camp where she is staying, Gerta meets Lev, a fellow teen survivor who she just might be falling for, despite her feelings for someone else. With a newfound Jewish identity she never knew she had, and a return to the life of music she thought she lost forever, Gerta must choose how to build a new future.

What the Night Sings is a book from the heart, of the heart, and to the heart. Vesper Stamper’s Gerta will stay with you long after you turn the last page. Her story is one of hope and redemption and life–a blessing to the world.” –Deborah Heiligman, award-winning author of Charles and Emma and Vincent and Theo (Young Adult)

Shortly after moving into an old, spooky home, thirteen-year-old Thomas Small and his family start hearing strange noises. The house has a past, and when Thomas discovers a hidden passageway that may have been part of the Underground Railroad, the family realizes the house has a history as well. To find out all there is to know about the House of Dies Drear, Thomas must explore secret rooms—and the secrets of lives lived centuries before, lives that tell the story of America’s troubled early years. (Kids, 5th or 6th grade level)

Thomas Small and his best friend Pesty Darrow have been keeping the secret of the vast treasure that’s hidden in Mr. Pluto’s cave, once a stop on the Underground Railroad. Pesty also has to keep the treasure a secret from her family, who want it for themselves. And there are plenty more secrets in the underground passageways—hidden rooms, Indian legends, and terrifying ghosts. Now Thomas thinks that Pesty might be keeping some secrets from him, too. If they can’t trust each other, how will they ever protect the treasure? (Kids, 5th or 6th grade level)

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Program comes a haunting, romantic, and suspenseful story about one girl’s search for healing in a grand and mysterious hotel full of secrets.

Stay tonight. Stay forever.

When Audrey Casella arrives for an unplanned stay at the grand Hotel Ruby, she’s grateful for the detour. Just months after their mother’s death, Audrey and her brother, Daniel, are on their way to live with their grandmother, dumped on the doorstep of a DNA-matched stranger because their father is drowning in his grief.

Audrey and her family only plan to stay the night, but life in the Ruby can be intoxicating, extending their stay as it provides endless distractions—including handsome guest Elias Lange, who sends Audrey’s pulse racing. However, the hotel proves to be as strange as it is beautiful. Nightly fancy affairs in the ballroom are invitation only, and Audrey seems to be the one guest who doesn’t have an invite. Instead, she joins the hotel staff on the rooftop, catching whispers about the hotel’s dark past.

The more Audrey learns about the new people she’s met, the more her curiosity grows. She’s torn in different directions—the pull of her past with its overwhelming loss, the promise of a future that holds little joy, and an in-between in a place that is so much more than it seems…

And the 13th chapter will only add to the mystery behind the 13th floor of Hotel Ruby…and ultimately, what it means for Audrey.

Welcome to the Ruby.

Posted in crime fiction, Literature

“Off to War” by Wayne Hancock

I can cross another novel off my list. I am a fan of author Wayne Hancock and the mysteries or crime fictions that he normally writes. This one didn’t let me down, even though it was a little different than previous books in this series. In previous books, they were usually looking for someone who murdered somebody….in this book they’re trying to keep German spies from invading their community. I was entertained the whole time and I enjoyed the book. I also enjoyed the fact that you get a sense of how people lived back then versus how they live today.

Synopsis: Off to War is the fourth book, and the exciting conclusion to the Gotcha! Series, eleven years in the making. This time Buck Pettit’s investigating club is chasing German spies instead of murderers. Read how they find and eliminate this threat to our national security. What happens to Irv and Will as they reach the draft age? How will they react to this threat of war from abroad? With keen insight and a great ability to blend history and fiction, author Wayne Hancock illuminates the hard times and struggles that existed during the Great Depression of the 1930s.

Posted in historical fiction, Literature

“What the Night Sings” by Vesper Stamper

Well, I can add another book to my list of books I’ve read this year. I had read “Anne Frank: The Diary of A Young Girl” a couple of years back. It gave me the perspective of what it was like to be a Jew who was trying to hide from the Nazi’s during WW2 in the hopes that they can stay hidden until the war is over. This book gives you a completely different perspective and shows you what it’s like to be a Jew who actually got caught by the Nazi’s, separated from your family and sent to live in a concentration camp before finally being liberated. If you want to read something different that will change how you look at history, this will be a good book.

Synopsis: After losing her family and everything she knew in the Nazi concentration camps, Gerta is finally liberated, only to find herself completely alone. Without her papa, her music, or even her true identity, she must move past the task of surviving and on to living her life. In the displaced persons camp where she is staying, Gerta meets Lev, a fellow teen survivor who she just might be falling for, despite her feelings for someone else. With a newfound Jewish identity she never knew she had, and a return to the life of music she thought she lost forever, Gerta must choose how to build a new future.